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Brilliant DIY To Hide An Ugly Backyard Shed

Most of us would love to have the freedom to build our dream homes from the ground up - from the exterior layout to the interior design. However, many people move into homes that have had at least one previous owner, so many features in the home may not be specific to their taste. Instead of just assimilating into the style of your predecessors, there are many parts of the home that you can renovate or revamp to suit your own preference.

Leming and her family live in a home that had a previous owner. There was one part of her home that she was not quite fond of, however: the pool shed. "We have an eyesore of a pool in the backyard that houses the filtration system of the pool," she wrote in her post. While relocating the equipment was an option, it wasn't a very budget-friendly one. "So the only option I had was to beautify it, instead, so it wouldn't be such an eyesore!" The project was relatively simple, and it only required a handful of affordable tools and materials. Clearly a lot of thought and creativity went into this DIY, but the finished product was absolutely worth the time.

What you'll need:

  • 1 gallon Behr exterior paint (Antique Tin)
  • 3-inch-diameter drain pipe
  • Rust-oleum hammered paint-and-primer-in-one spray paint (dark bronze)
  • 6-inch corner braces
  • Ferrule and stop set
  • Lag screws
  • Wire rope
  • 3-inch drain pipe caps

This was the "eyesore" to which Leming was referring. It definitely could use some sprucing up.


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Leming wasn't happy with the "muddy brown" color that the previous owners had painted the shed. The first step of the makeover was to repaint the entire shed in her favorite color: gray.


Hometalk

Next, she grabbed some drainage pipes (3 inches in diameter) to make a vertical garden. "I still wanted to have the shed blend in with the surrounding, so I thought I'd build a vertical gardening system on the left part of the shed," she wrote on her post.


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Leming cut the drainage pipes into two-foot-long sections. Then, she covered the ends of each pipe with caps and drilled five circular holes into each of them. She also made sure to include drainage holes on the opposite end of each plant hole.


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To finish them off, she spray-painted the pipes a beautiful metallic gray.


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Next, she installed corner braces onto the top of the shed, leaving an inch overhanging on the top so that she could later run wire rope through them.


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After, she drilled two small holes into the top and bottom ends of the pipes for the wire ropes. "I used a ferrule and stop set for each set of wires and crimped them in place, spacing each pipe 8 inches apart. This keeps them in place," she explains.


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The vertical gardening system is really starting to come together! There's one more thing to add to complete this beautiful DIY project:


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Beautiful succulents!


Garden Club of Celebration

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Just look at how perfectly they fit into the pockets.


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A close-up of one of the pipes. They are nice and secure, so her succulents can hang safely.


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Once the vertical garden was filled with gorgeous succulents, she added some other potted plants and miscellaneous garden items to complete the look of her shed. What a transformation from the "eyesore" that she started out with! For more information on this creative DIY project, be sure to check out Leming's post here.


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Don't forget to SHARE this fantastic transformation with your friends and family.

H/T: Hometalk

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