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Flour Sacks In The 1930s Had Colorful Patterns For Customers To Sew Dresses From

During the Great Depression, resources were pretty scarce. Every little bit counted and scrimping and saving was quite simply a way of life. Although people are still interested in living thriftily, back in those times it was what you had to do to survive. That's why it should come as no surprise that generation was the ultimate DIY generation. 

Clothing in particular was an area that women back then had to be thrifty with. Knowing how to sew was an essential skill, and many women noticed that a great way to save money on clothes was to reuse the cotton sacks that flour was packaged in back in those days. When flour manufacturers heard about the trend, they were only too happy to help out and started printing their sacks with all kinds of colorful patterns!

Back in the 1930s, flour companies began noticing that women were turning their cotton flour sacks into clothing, diapers, dish cloths and more. Times were hard and the companies decided to help families out by packaging their flour in beautiful patterns.


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The sacks had bright, colorful designs on them and some even had designs and instructions for making toys (pictured below). They did have company labels printed on them, but that ink was washable.


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Flour sack clothing was pretty common in those times and the sacks featured a wide range of designs.


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How cute is that?


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By some estimates, approximately 3.5 million women and children wore flour sack clothing during the Depression.


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Back then, every single penny saved was critical.


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So if they had to wear clothing made from sacks, they may as well look good.


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The patterns were made to appeal to people across all spectrums.


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A lot of these styles are actually still in use today.


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Sacks included instructions on how to wash out the company's logo.


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Some also had tutorials. That's what I call vintage life hacks.


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As the trend became more popular, there were even published booklets with tips and pointers.


Treasures N Textures

All the kids here are wearing flour sack clothing, but you’d never know because of bright patterns and great sewing.


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Back in those times, you could often tell if some kids were related by the common sack patterns in their clothing.


Textile Ranger

Women also made dresses for themselves from the sacks.


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Some of the more enterprising women of the day even made extra cash sewing dresses for other people.


Vintage Dancer

Even the scraps from sack clothing that was worn out were reused to make other things like quilts.


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With the onset of WWII, however, things started to change. Cotton was rationed to make uniforms for soldiers and people were only too happy to help the war effort.


NWW2M

That was when flour started being packaged in the paper bags we're familiar with today. Did you ever think something as simple as flour would have such a rich history?


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Via: Littlethings | Kindness Blog

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