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In The 1970s This Plane Landed Somewhere Unexpected. This Is What It Looks Like Today.


polar.mike

On October 8, 1970, C-121 Lockheed Constellation "Pegasus" ran into a storm and crash landed in the middle of the icy Antarctic desert. Amazingly, no one was injured in the crash and the wreckage remains in the same place now, 45 years after its final landing.


Eli Duke

In "The Last Flight South By the Flying Horse Pegasus", Noel Gillspie describes the last moments: “I remember watching with absolute horror, the No. 4 propeller spinning off the engine. Moments later No. 4 engine ripped off it’s mount, as if by some giant hand followed by No. 3 propeller then No. 3 engine then the entire right wing. While I recall it in slow motion, I doubt that the whole chain of events took more than a few seconds … A very eerie temporary silence ensued. Hardly a word was spoken on the flight deck. Seconds later we started a rapid evacuation on the left side of the aircraft, putting all our endless hours of emergency training to work. It was only a half a mile from the aircraft parking and cargo staging area, but it took over three hours for anyone to locate the crashed aircraft.”


Eli Duke

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Eli Duke

The ice strip where the Pegasus landed was named the Pegasus White Ice Runway in honor of the crash. The airstrip is on the southernmost of the three airfields serving the McMurdo Station, a New Zealand claimed station on Ross Island. The United States uses the McMurdo science facility as well. It's Antarctica's largest community, capable of housing over 1,200 residents. 
Chef Bill Morris

Bill Morris, a chef and writer of "You're Going Where?" writes: “At different times of the year due to wind and temperature more or less of the plane is exposed. I borrowed some pictures from others to show more of the plane.”
Chef Bill Morris

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Chef Bill Morris


Chef Bill Morris

Credit: Messy Nessy Chic

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