Teacher Sells His 25-Year-Old Toy Collection To Help A Little Boy Get A New Wheelchair

Jun 15, 2015 By Archit Tripathi

Logan Roninger is an adorable 4-year-old boy from Texas. When he was just 18 months old, he was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic disease that causes his muscles to weaken. As a result, Logan has never walked and gets around in a wheelchair.

He got his first power wheelchair when he was 2.

Both of Logan's parents are biologists, so they love taking their son outdoors with them as much as possible so he can enjoy the beauty of Klamath Falls in Oregon, where the family lives. As he gets older, however, bringing him along will get harder. That's why Logan's parents wanted to get him a Tankchair (an off-road wheelchair). The first power wheelchair was covered by insurance, but the Tankchair isn't, so they began to try to raise money. Local businesses and schools all pitched and raised around $11,000.

Unfortunately, the Tankchair is $17,000, so the Roningers were still short of their goal. 

Luckily for them, humanity has a way of surprising you sometimes. Nat Ellis, a business and marketing teacher at one of the high schools that contributed to the fund, heard about the shortfall and decided to use the power of eBay to come to the rescue.

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Ellis had built up a collection of over 1,139 toys from fast food restaurants that he put up for auction on eBay to raise the remaining money for Logan.

The collection started when a student put a toy on his desk 25 years ago. More kids followed suit and the collection just snowballed from there.

According to Ellis, several of these toys are worth $30-60 each. The collectible toy market can definitely be a lucrative one, and has gained a lot of attention recently with big finds on reality shows like "Storage Wars,” "Toy Hunter" and others.

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Ellis, who had never met the Roningers until this year, was originally planning to auction the collection for his retirement fund.

The best part? The person who won the auction donated the collection back to Ellis so he could re-auction it to raise even more money. The second auction can be found here.

Via: ABC News

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