This Artist Colorized Old Photos With Photoshop To Give A New Perspective On History

Mar 8, 2016 By Archit Tripathi

History is perhaps one of the most important things that people can learn about. They say that history repeats itself, and those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Take Hitler, for example. If he'd paid a little more attention to history, he might have remembered that Napoleon's troops also suffered heavy losses when they marched into a Russian winter without being adequately prepared for it. Luckily for us, he didn't, which is one of the reasons we're not speaking German right now.

Although history is always fascinating, some of the older, black-and-white photos can leave you wanting. When I was a little kid, I basically thought that before the invention of color photography, everything just existed in black-and-white, and there was no color in the world. It was quickly explained to me that this wasn't the case, and ever since then I've always wished I could see the world back then in full color.

Apparently, I wasn't alone in that desire. Artist Marina Amaral meticulously researches history in order to accurately colorize old photographs using Photoshop. She dives in deep, talking to experts and researching the time period, fashion trends, and much more to get her photos to feel as authentic as possible. She says that adding color gives a new perspective to these moments, because the addition of color makes it easier to transport ourselves into that moment and relive it. Judging from the gorgeous photos below, I'd have to agree.

1. It's easy to see why Grace Kelly, American actress and Princess of Monaco, set so many hearts afire in her day.

2. A boy poses with the shark he caught in Russell, New Zealand in 1915.

3. President John F. Kennedy (J.F.K.) with his First Lady, Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.

4. The Kennedy brothers: Robert F., Ted, and President John F. Kennedy.

5. Lee Harvey Oswald, the man who assassinated President J.F.K. on November 22, 1963.

6. June 6, 1944: Wounded soldiers are helped by members of the 5th and 6th Engineer Special Brigade on Omaha beach. The day would later come to be known as "D-Day."

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7. Three men loiter on a San Francisco street in 1939.

8. Three French boys examine a German Panzer tank on August 25, 1944.

9. Canadian infantry in Campochiaro, Italy, November 11, 1943. As Canadian troops closed in on them, the retreating Germans left snipers active on the rooftops to pick off Allied soldiers.

10. September 24, 1938: British Prime Minister Arthur Neville Chamberlain addresses the crowd at Heston airfield in London after returning from a meeting with Hitler in Germany. Their discussion came to be known as the Munich Agreement (which Hitler later violated, dragging Britain and France into World War II).

11. Broad Street in New York City, 1905.

12. Here's what a typical store in the market square looked like in Waco, Texas in 1939.

13. A wounded Cambodian fighter is taken to a hidden hospital in the Viet Cong area on September 15, 1970. 

14. British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, the man who succeeded Neville Chamberlain, and also the first-ever honorary citizen of the United States.

15. U.S. Mail Service pilot William C. Hopson models his winter uniform, used for flying in an open cockpit in 1929.

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16. The B-26 Marauder was also known as the Widowmaker back during World War II thanks to the high number of accidents during takeoff and landing. 

17. American soldiers of the 703rd Tank Destroyer Battalion enjoy a moment of levity in a pit near Marigny, France during World War II.

18. Robert E. Lee, Confederate General of the Civil War.

19. Here's Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States, in 1860. I think the lack of beard is more jarring to me here than the presence of color.

20. Though many of his techniques are no longer in favor today, Sigmund Freud is undoubtedly the father of modern psychoanalysis.

"Trust me, I have a cigar."

21. King Tut, President Herbert Hoover's dog, makes his nightly rounds with White House police officer W.S. Newton. 

22. A French boy greets Indian troops stationed in Marseilles during World War I, circa 1914.

H/T: LifeBuzz | Marina Amaral

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