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8 Neat Ways To Use Your Hair Dryer That Don't Have Anything To Do With Hair

Here at Wimp we love any hack that makes seemingly impossible or tedious tasks easier ... which is why we always make it a point to check out what the innovative minds behind the YouTube channel Household Hacker have to say. They have it all covered, from how to keep winter from being totally miserable to keeping unwanted intruders out. Their goal, after all, is to "try to bring out the MacGyver in all of us." That's why nearly four million people subscribe to the channel; the life hacks, modifications, tutorials, science experiments, and even pranks help "make [their] life easier, more fun and specifically more exciting."

When they started the channel in 2007, they first uploaded a video explaining how to power a television using just a AAA battery. Their third video, however, is what originally drew attention. Entitled "How to Charge an iPod Using Electrolytes and an Onion," the video claimed that anyone could use a plain white onion and some Gatorade to recharge a dead iPod. The video piqued the interest of a popular (though unofficial) website about Apple products, which lent it legitimacy and helped it spread to hundreds of other blogs. Just a week after it was originally uploaded, the video had been viewed over 4 million times! Unfortunately, all that talk also drew the attention of some folks who make their livings disproving these kinds of theories: Jamie and Adam of the popular science television show Mythbusters. In the end, the show replicated the tutorial in the video several times, never achieving any success, and dubbed it a hoax. It worked well, however, in terms of drumming up interest in the fledgling channel.

Since then, the channel has had 17 more videos each surpass the five million mark for lifetime views and countless more reach one million or more. Although provocative and "hoax" videos were pretty popular in the beginning, the videos have since evolved into more practical and useful ones, such as how to use vinegar in a number of ways or this one showing useful alternatives for a hair dryer. The lack of high-profile hoaxes hasn't hurt their numbers, though; the channel is more popular now than before.

H/T: Household Hacker

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