Advertisement

An Entire Town Lives Underground In The Australian Desert. I Couldn't Believe The Reason Why

It is not all that uncommon for a town to be built in the middle of the desert, but anyone would be hard-pressed to find a desert town that even remotely resembles this. At first glance, it can appear as if the area is merely a barren wasteland, but under the surface lies a town that hides from the scorching sun of the Australian desert.

Coober Pedy is known as “the opal capital of the world” as the small mining town is in an area rich in the rare stone. Since opal was first found in the area in 1915, the town’s activities have centered on mining operations. With keeping cool and the lack of water being a constant battle, almost none of the homes or local businesses are above ground.

All homes are almost entirely dug out of rock, and ceilings are supported with solid wide columns to prevent cave-ins. With ample room, living in these spaces is not nearly as bad as it might seem.


YouTube

The outside temperatures on the surface can reach up to 125 degrees, so living underground was really the only option when operations first began almost a century ago.


Nicolas Jones via flickr

Electricity is readily available as the lights almost always need to be on with the lack of sun and windows.


Benjamin Jakabeck via flickr

Advertisement

One of the more unique problems with providing utilities to these homes is that running water and sewage lines can’t be ran underground. As such, most homes have bathrooms and kitchen right beside the surface entrance.  


Peter Hemminher via flickr

Even the surface entrances are partially underground.


Peter Hemminher via flickr

This local motel shows just how much can be done with some effort. Funnily enough, the area is so rich in opal that the town found $360,000 worth of it when digging out the individual rooms.


Albert Llaussas via flickr

Since the first hotel was built in the 1980s, the area has become somewhat of a tourist attraction for those seeking the unusual.


Benjamin Jakabeck via flickr

The town has several shops, restaurants, a museum and even a church.


Benjamin Jakabeck via flickr

Advertisement

Just because you live underground doesn’t mean that you can decorate your front yard.


F8BThere via flickr

Just like anywhere else, local businesses put a lot into their entrance to help attract customers.


F8BThere via flickr

There is even a local golf course in the desert. It is played in the sand, but people bring around a small piece of turf with them from hole to hole to tee off from.


BozzyD200 via flickr

Via: Messy Nessy Chic