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Here's What Happens To Your Body After You Quit Smoking

Giving up smoking is the single greatest thing you can do for your own health. One-third of people who smoke will die directly from a smoking-related condition. Many more will suffer from smoking-related illnesses for all of their life.

Smoking leaves smokers smelling bad. It doesn't taste nice. Even the supposed calming effects of cigarettes are a myth - smoking actually makes you more stressed not less.

There are so many good reasons to give up smoking, but we all know that it can be a little tough when you get started. So, let's take a look at some brilliant effects quitting will have on your body to help motivate you to keep away from the nicotine for the rest of your life.

A Subtle Start

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Carbon monoxide is a poison to the human system and it binds to blood cells. In just eight hours, smoking-related carbon monoxide is scrubbed from your system.

Get Rid Of The Evil Gas

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Carbon monoxide is a poison to the human system and it binds to blood cells. In just eight hours, smoking-related carbon monoxide is scrubbed from your system.

Oxygen Returns To Normal

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While your carbon monoxide levels are falling, your oxygen levels are rising. Eight hours after you quit, the oxygen in your blood reaches normal levels.

Protecting Your Heart

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It takes only 24 hours before an ex-smoker is at a reduced risk of heart attack. That's a single day and a great reason to quit in itself.

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Get Your Senses Back

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Two days after you stub out the last smoke, you'll find that your senses of taste and smell are getting better as nerve endings start to renew.

Walking Gets Easier

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It can take up to three months, but you'll find that walking becomes easier and more pleasurable as your circulation improves. Which means you can exercise more.

Energy Boost

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Somewhere between one and nine months after you quit, you will start to feel an energy boost as your body no longer diverts resources to scrubbing away the smoke.

Smoker's Cough Goes On The Run

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This may take up to nine months, but you'll find that you can say goodbye to your coughing, sinus infections and shortness of breath.

9. Lungs Start To Cleanse

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After about nine months, the hairs in your lungs, cilia, start to grow back and in turn, they help to clean and maintain the lungs and this reduces the risk of infection.

Hearty News

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Once you reach the one year anniversary of quitting - your chance of coronary heart disease drops to half that of a smoker! That's news worth celebrating.

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Cancer Risks Fall

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Once you hit the five-year mark, you have half the risk of getting mouth or throat cancer compared to a smoker and half the risk of lung cancer, too.

Stroke Risk Plummets

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Also on the five-year mark, the ex-smoker's risk for having a stroke becomes the same as the rest of the population. That's awesome.

Lung Cancer Risks Return To Normal

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It takes 10 years without a cigarette, but finally, your risk of contracting lung cancer becomes the same as anyone else's risk, which is pretty low.

Other Cancer Risks Drop Too

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Once you hit your decade anniversary, you can be pleased to know that you've reduced your risks of kidney, pancreas, mouth, throat, bladder and esophageal cancers.

Bye Bye Coronary Risks

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Once you've been 15 years without a smoke, your risk of heart disease drops entirely back to normal levels. Congratulations, you've done it!

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