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The Dangers Of Scented Candles

How often do you read the fine print on the items around your house? In most cases, neglecting to read every word on every label isn't too big of a deal. We all know how to operate a hairdryer, wash a t-shirt or use a candle, right? As it turns out, one of those activities might be trickier than you think. New Jersey mother Meghan Budden learned this lesson the hard way after she had a startling encounter with a scented candle.

This past December, Budden lit two scented candles while she worked around the house one day. She said that she "didn't think anything of it," and had them burning for "probably six or seven hours." It wasn't until the next day that she realized something was wrong. Black soot, given off by the candles, was inside her nose. Even worse, she found it inside of her baby's nose as well. While the sight of black soot, often associated with chimneys and factories, was shocking, it isn't actually as dangerous as it sounds. According to the National Candle Association, the amount of soot put off by common household candles isn't enough to harm humans. Candles can, however, damage the walls and ceilings around them if left burning for too long.

While Meghan and her son's case seems alarming, it's important to remember that it was a result of her son being so young and the candle use being so extensive. If used responsibly, there is no danger of candle soot harming those around it. Nevertheless, this is an important reminder that it never hurts to read the labels on the things you purchase.

Remember to SHARE this important reminder with your friends and family.
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