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This Is What Happens When Snake Venom Mixes With Human Blood

Out of over 3,000 species of snakes worldwide, only about 600 are considered poisonous. Out of those, an even smaller fraction still is considered deadly and/or medically significant. That small minority, however, is dangerous enough that scientists believe humans may have evolved an instinctive fear of all snakes simply because of how bad those few are. Different snake venoms work in different ways, but one fairly common type is a venom that acts as a blood coagulant, stopping the victim's blood supply in its tracks. One of the best - and most lethal - examples of coagulant venom is the Russell's pit viper or "Daboia" viper which inhabits most of the Indian subcontinent as well other parts of Southeast Asia. In this video, a BBC reporter obtains some of this deadly venom and mixes a single drop with some human blood to show its effects. Although the presence of air also aids in coagulation and would not normally be present inside an actual victim, the venom takes mere seconds to turn the liquid contents of the glass into a single thick, gelatinous mass. Although this is definitely really scary, it should be noted that scientists can utilize these properties for medical benefits as well. For instance, a weaker version of this venom could help people with diseases like hemophilia, which prevents blood from clotting properly such that even a papercut could lead to deadly amounts of blood loss.
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